Catholic Charismatic Church  - There was a time when faith was not found wanting.

At the Vatican on 16 June 2000, Pope John Paul II ratified and ordered the publication of Dominus Iesus.  This Declaration of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith was signed and published by then Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, now Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI,  in August of the same year. 

In this declaration, the Roman Catholic Church recognized the validity of Orders and Sacraments of Old Catholic denominations in the following terms: “The Churches which, while not existing in perfect communion with the [Roman] Catholic Church, remain united to her by means of the closest bonds, that is, by apostolic succession and a valid Eucharist, are true particular Churches.”

“Therefore, these separated Churches and communities as such…have by no means been deprived of significance and importance in the mystery of salvation. For the Spirit of Christ has not refrained from using them as means of salvation which derive their efficacy from the very fullness of grace and truth entrusted to the Catholic Church.“ IV. 17. Unicity and Unity of the Church.

Catholics may receive the Eucharist, penance, or anointing from sacred ministers of Catholic denominations whose Holy Orders are considered valid by the Roman Catholic Church.  This includes all Eastern Orthodox priests, as well as priests of the Old Catholic or Polish National Church.”  (Thomas P. Doyle, O.P., p.44)

This, of course, does not limit the CCC to exclusivity of relations with the Roman Catholic Church, but merely establishes the basis of such an historic and modern relationship.  It is well-established that the Old Catholics have had a long-standing and cordial relationship with Anglican jurisdictions throughout the world, as reflected in co-consecration of Anglican bishops by Old Catholic bishops.

The Catholic Charismatic Church derives from the Old Catholic Apostolic Succession to which Fr. Doyle refers.  The CCC adheres to the traditional Old Catholic position that does not support the Union of Utrecht position on ordination of women and homosexuals.  This, of course, does not limit the CCC to exclusivity of relations with the Roman Catholic Church, but merely establishes the basis of such an historic and modern relationship. It is well-established that the traditional Old Catholics have had a long-standing and cordial relationship with Anglican jurisdictions throughout the world, as reflected in co-consecration in the United Kingdom itself of Anglican bishops by Old Catholic bishops.




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